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Know Your Patterns

Cultivating Awareness

The Key to Being in Control

Breath Awareness

Our breathe is key to everything that allows us to heal. It is the foundation of all our brain function and energy system of the body. It is a force that moves everything and a source that gives life to every living thing. The breathe gives us vital energy that creates, animates and sustains all things. In practice we learn to connect with this vital energy to bring harmony between the body, mind and spirit. 

When we experience trauma, fear or under stress we often hold our breath thus literally starving our brains and our cells of essential oxygen.

Breath awareness is the practice of being consciously aware of your breath. In this one on one session, I guide the clients on identifying the rhythm of their breath. If we understand the rhythm of our breath, then we are able to stay over our mind. Our breath is linked to our emotions. For every emotion there is a particular rhythm in the breath. When we are aware of these changes, we can transform our emotions and invite in well-being.

Paying attention to our breath and breathing properly can decrease the effects of stress on the body, anxiety and increase our overall physical and mental health. It allows us to restore and revitalize the mind on a cellular level.

With a powerful, full breath, you can charge the whole body with fresh life. That means much greater purification of the blood, as well as oxygenation of the entire body. Thus facilitating a relaxing response to calm and balance the nervous system. 

“By controlling the act of breathing you can efficiently control all the various motions in the body. You can easily and quickly control and develop the body, mind, and spirit. It is through pranayama that you can control your circumstances and character and can consciously harmonize the individual life with the cosmic life”

~ Swami Sivananda

Sensory Awareness

We use our senses to function throughout the day. Sensory Awareness is a mindfulness practice through which we connect with our own natural intelligence and vitality. It’s a process of inquiry through simple explorations of everyday moments and lively interactions with life as it is. 

By practicing mindfulness of our body, we are able to connect our brains to present experiences more easily, which can lead to our brains being more accepting of reality. Sensory awareness can give us a clearer foundation with which to understand and work with our feelings and emotions on a somatic level. I find sensations are the key to understanding what were/are the basic reactions to our stressors and traumatic events. Without awareness we will continue to repeat, respond, resist, and not really understand the source of our reactions. 

Paying attention to our sensations allows the client to concentrate on the reality of what is happening to him/her in the moment. Acknowledging them and bringing them to the forefront of the current therapeutic situation offers the client a somatic way to recognize what is still happening for him/her and a viable means of working with the trauma, in a way that was not previously available. The sensations that are being experienced can tell us a lot about how we related to the trauma in the past and how we are still currently responding.

When we are grounded in the moment, we are freed to act from a place of connection rather than ambition – engaging with reality rather than fighting it. 

Sensory Awareness

We use our senses to function throughout the day. Sensory Awareness is a mindfulness practice through which we connect with our own natural intelligence and vitality. It’s a process of inquiry through simple explorations of everyday moments and lively interactions with life as it is. 

By practicing mindfulness of our body, we are able to connect our brains to present experiences more easily, which can lead to our brains being more accepting of reality. Sensory awareness can give us a clearer foundation with which to understand and work with our feelings and emotions on a somatic level. I find sensations are the key to understanding what were/are the basic reactions to our stressors and traumatic events. Without awareness we will continue to repeat, respond, resist, and not really understand the source of our reactions. 

Paying attention to our sensations allows the client to concentrate on the reality of what is happening to him/her in the moment. Acknowledging them and bringing them to the forefront of the current therapeutic situation offers the client a somatic way to recognize what is still happening for him/her and a viable means of working with the trauma, in a way that was not previously available. The sensations that are being experienced can tell us a lot about how we related to the trauma in the past and how we are still currently responding.

When we are grounded in the moment, we are freed to act from a place of connection rather than ambition – engaging with reality rather than fighting it.